Neighbors of MN
Akram

 


I assisted with welcoming refugees on the shores of Greece, and helping them find clothes and food to continue on their journey.


“I grew up in a Coptic Christian family in Egypt. The word “Coptic” means Egyptian in the original Egyptian language. Coptics are indigenous Egyptians, descended from the ancient Egyptians, not Arabs, as people generally assume.

I moved from my hometown in the Nile Delta to Cairo for university, and while I was there, I met people who introduced me to God’s heart for all the people of the world. I am a people person in general, I loved it when I travelled to other countries all over the world on mission trips and saw God manifested in many different ways—I saw people get saved, get healed, find freedom. I assisted with welcoming refugees on the shores of Greece, and helping them find clothes and food to continue on their journey.


When I came to America, I saw the same need, refugees and immigrants are here in our back yard.


When I came to America, I saw the same need, refugees and immigrants are here in our back yard. As someone who came from a marginalized people group in my own country and immigrated to the U.S., I felt a connection with others who left their home countries for America.

God called us to go and make disciples in all the world, so where are we supposed to go? I’ve traveled to quite a few countries, but I realize I can find people from all of those countries right here in my own city. Working with Arrive, welcoming refugees, and meeting physical and social needs gives me a chance to share the love of Jesus as they make their new home here in the United States, where I have chosen for my home as well.

When I moved from my hometown to Cairo, I was surrounded by new people, new places, away from my family, and I realized that my mind was more open to new ideas as well–more open to God. I find I can often relate to refugees in this area of change.  When everything has been exactly the same for a long time, it’s easy to stay in the same place mentally as well, but when that consistent life is disrupted, whether by choice or by force, it makes people rethink their life and accepted beliefs. I really like being part of that journey, with both refugees and volunteers at Arrive Ministries.”